NFL

B/R NFL 1000: Top 16 Fullbacks

Matt MillerNFL Draft Lead WriterFebruary 25, 2014

B/R NFL 1000: Top 16 Fullbacks

1 of 17

    Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

    Editor's note: This is the third installment in Bleacher Report's NFL 1000 for the 2013 season. This signature series runs through April 24, with NFL Draft Lead Writer Matt Miller ranking the best players at every position. You can read more about the series in this introductory article. See the NFL 1000 page for more rankings.

    Throw away the past, the potential and the future. Look at just this year. Who was the best fullback in the NFL? Who was the worst? That’s what the NFL 1000 aims to identify. Throw out the narratives and the fantasy football stats and dig into the film. Then, we’ll see who comes out on top.

    The B/R 1000 metric is based heavily on scouting each player and grading the key criteria for each position. The criteria are given different weights according to importance for a possible best score of 100.

    Potential is not taken into consideration. Nor are career accomplishments.

    Fullbacks are judged on run blocking (25 points), pass blocking (25), power (20), speed (10) and receiving (20).

    In the case of ties, our team asked, "Which player would I rather have on my team?" and set the rankings accordingly.

    Subjective? Yes. But ties are no fun.

    Each player was scouted by me and a team of experienced evaluators, with these key criteria in mind. The following scouting reports and grades are the work of months of film study from our team.

    All statistics from Pro Football Focus (subscription required). Players' heights, weights and seasons from NFL.com.

16. Tommy Bohanon, New York Jets

2 of 17

    The Star-Ledger-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Run Block

    13/25

    Tommy Bohanon (6’1”, 246 lbs, one season) does not generate much movement as a run-blocker. He does a fine job getting in position to make blocks, but his blocks are too often ineffective or whiffed. The Jets did not have significantly better success running behind his lead blocks than without them in 2013.

    Pass Block

    20/25

    Bohanon displays good movement skills in the backfield as well as disciplined patience as a pass protector. He might not shut down many bigger or more explosive pass-rushers, but he has shown that he can find blitzers and adequately pick them up to provide protection for his quarterback.

    Power

    14/20

    Bohanon’s power game is underwhelming, both as a rusher and a run-blocker. His punch as a blocker is relatively weak, and he does not show that he can drive front-seven defenders away from the football. He ran for 62 yards on 17 attempts in 2013, but not much of that yardage came from running through contact.

    Speed

    6/10

    Bohanon is an adequate but not spectacular athlete from the fullback position. He does not display much burst or quickness out of the backfield, and he does not have the vision or speed to make big plays as a runner.

    Hands

    15/20

    Mostly used as a safety-valve checkdown receiving option. Bohanon is a reliable hands catcher. He looks most comfortable on the field when he is asked to run routes and get open as a receiver.

    Overall

    68/100

    There is nothing special about Bohanon’s game, making him nothing more than a serviceable NFL fullback. He adds his most value as another third-down option as a receiver and a pass-blocker. He needs to become stronger and more attack-minded to make more plays as a lead blocker.

15. Stanley Havili, Indianapolis Colts

3 of 17

    Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    16/25

    Stanley Havili (6’0”, 243 lbs, two seasons) uses his feet well to get in position to make run blocks, but he doesn’t make effective blocks once he gets there. He can shoot his arms out from his body quickly, but he lacks a strong punch and whiffs on more blocks in front of him than he should.

    Pass Block

    16/25

    Though more inclined to be a pass-catcher than a pass-blocker, Havili is adequate in this capacity. He can use his quick feet to find rushers quickly and shield the pocket but sometimes looks lost in blitz pickup.

    Power

    14/20

    Havili does not exhibit much power as a blocker or runner. He does not display the ability to drive defenders away from the ball on his blocks, and he sometimes gets bounced backward when he attacks a defender at the second level. As a rusher, Havili managed just seven yards on seven carries in 2013.

    Speed

    7/10

    With good feet for a fullback, Havili is often successful in covering ground quickly to pick up lead blocks. He is not much of an open-field threat as a runner or receiver, but he is occasionally motioned out to wide receiver or used as a tight end or tailback, and he has ample athleticism to line up in those spots.

    Hands

    16/20

    Though his 2013 season will likely be remembered most for the pass that went off his hands and into the hands of New England Patriots linebacker Dont’a Hightower in Indianapolis’ playoff loss, he is a usually reliable receiver out of the backfield. He caught 19 passes for 132 yards on 22 targets in 2013.

    Overall

    69/100

    Havili is not a great blocker or runner, but he adds value as a special teams regular and as a good receiver out of the backfield.

14. Darrel Young, Washington Redskins

4 of 17

    Evan Vucci/Associated Press

     

    Run Block

    19/25

    Darrel Young (5’11”, 251 lbs, four seasons) is an effective outside run-blocker who uses his feet well to pick up strong blocks coming out of the backfield and on the perimeter. He is not a downhill, punch-in-the-gut lead blocker between the tackles.

    Pass Block

    17/25

    Young is a disciplined pass protector who can use his patience and foot skills to fill a gap in the pocket and stop a free rusher from coming into the backfield. Though he was not in the game often on passing downs in 2013, he was not a liability when needed as a pass-blocker.

    Power

    16/20

    There is not a strong power element in Young’s game. Though he made headlines for running for three touchdowns, including a game-winner, in Washington’s overtime victory over the San Diego Chargers in 2013, he is not typically a great short-yardage runner. As a blocker, he is more likely to get knocked backward by a defender than to drive one away from the ball.

    Speed

    8/10

    Young does not have the speed to stretch the field, but he is more than an adequate athlete for the fullback position. He uses his feet well to get outside the tackles and make blocks, and he has enough athleticism to regularly make plays downfield on special teams.

    Hands

    10/20

    Young caught just four passes on nine targets and dropped three balls in 2013. Catching the ball does not come naturally to him.

    Overall

    70/100

    Young is an adequate blocking fullback and a decent runner who uses his vision well out of the backfield to make plays. He has limited value on passing downs, but he has an increased role as a regular in special teams, an area in which he frequently gets downfield for important tackles or blocks.

13. James Develin, New England Patriots

5 of 17

    David J. Phillip/Associated Press

     

    Run Block

    18/25

    James Develin (6’3”, 251 lbs, one season) is not always quick enough to get out of his own runner’s way as a lead blocker, but he is a hard-nosed player who sacrifices his body to throw himself into blocks. He does a decent job of getting to the second level for blocks but struggles to sustain them.

    Pass Block

    15/25

    Develin won’t be mistaken for an offensive lineman or even a tight end with his pass protection, but he has the strength to hold up against bigger pass-rushers at the line of scrimmage. That said, the Patriots used him infrequently as a pass-blocker during the 2013 season.

    Power

    16/20

    Develin does not have natural power, but he can work defenders back with his strength and effort as a run-blocker and fight through contact as a runner. 

    Speed

    5/10

    For an NFL player, Develin is a subpar athlete. He does not beat defenders with acceleration, speed or quickness as a runner or receiver. As a blocker, he can be late getting to blocks or clearing out running lanes because of his limited foot skills.

    Hands

    16/20

    Develin caught all four passes thrown his way in 2013. While he is not much of a downfield receiving threat, he runs crisp routes and can catch the ball cleanly, even when it is thrown away from him.

    Overall

    70/100

    Develin lacks the physical attributes of a prototypical NFL player, but his motor is evident every time he steps on the field. He is an adequate blocker, he can gain a few yards here and there as a runner and receiver, and he even showed he can play on the line of scrimmage on a Patriots team starved for tight ends in 2013.

12. Greg Jones, Houston Texans

6 of 17

    Wade Payne/Associated Press

     

    Run Block

    20/25

    Greg Jones (6’1”, 251 lbs, 10 seasons) is a solid but unspectacular run-blocker. While he uses his feet well and usually sticks his blocks, he does not exhibit great strength as a lead blocker and sometimes lets blitzers run through him.

    Pass Block

    16/25

    Jones is rarely used as a pass-blocker and often looks lost when he plays in that role. He does not always pick up blocks he has the opportunity to get, and he can be overwhelmed by bigger, faster edge rushers.

    Power

    14/20

    Jones has the size and strength to hold up against bigger linebackers or even defensive linemen, but he is not an overpowering run-blocker. He has not shown much in recent years as a between-the-tackles runner. He had just one positive gain on the ground in 2013.

    Speed

    8/10

    Jones has enough speed to get downfield and make plays as a receiver out of the backfield. As a blocker, he uses his feet well to get to the second level or outside to pick up blocks that can spring running plays downfield.

    Hands

    12/20

    Jones is a hit-or-miss pass-catcher who caught five passes for 34 yards on 10 targets in 2013. He does a good job tracking down passes thrown his way in the flats.

    Overall

    70/100

    Although he is a solid all-around fullback who has shown he can run the ball, make catches out of the backfield and be a steady run-blocker, Jones did not play a big role in the Texans offense in 2013. There is nothing special about his game.

11. Cory Harkey, St. Louis Rams

7 of 17

    Scott Kane-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Run Block

    18/25

    A hybrid H-back, Cory Harkey (6’4”, 259 lbs, two seasons) is utilized as a run-blocker both out of the backfield and as a tight end at the line of scrimmage. He is used best as a lead blocker out of the backfield, and he does a good job of getting upfield to pick up second-level blocks. He also does a solid job of blocking outside defenders from the line of scrimmage, but he sometimes gets overpowered by defensive ends.

    Pass Block

    14/25

    Harkey is seldom used as a pass-blocker and struggles in that capacity. Often lined up against edge rushers when used as a tight end pass-blocker, he struggles to kick out to protect the edge and is not much of a match for bigger defensive ends or outside linebackers.

    Power

    14/20

    Though Harkey is a big H-back, he does not assert his size well as either a blocker or a runner. He does not often drive defenders away from the ball on run blocks. He did not have any rushing attempts in 2013 and is not known to run through contact in the open field when running after a catch.

    Speed

    7/10

    When Harkey is able to get open for a catch, he shows quick feet in turning upfield and extending plays. That said, he lacks top-end acceleration and struggles to separate from linebackers. He exhibits the quickness to block at the second level, but he is not a downfield impact player.

    Hands

    18/20

    Harkey’s tight end background helps him as a receiver. He runs good short routes and can catch the ball cleanly away from his body. He caught 13 passes on 16 targets in 2013 but dropped two balls.

    Overall

    71/100

    A highly versatile role player, Harkey can line up as either a fullback or tight end, often positioning himself one step behind the line of scrimmage. He is frequently used in pre-snap motion, taking advantage of his quickness and ability to line up in a variety of spots. He is not spectacular in any one capacity offensively, but he is a staple on place-kicking and punting teams.

10. Jed Collins, New Orleans Saints

8 of 17

    David Banks/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    20/25

    Jed Collins (6’1”, 255 lbs, three seasons) is a solid but inconsistent lead run-blocker. He can get to the second level of the opposing defense quickly and typically sticks his blocks, but he struggles against bigger, stronger defenders, especially when he allows them to come to him rather than attacking them.

    Pass Block

    16/25

    Sent out as a route-runner on passing plays more often than he is asked to block, Collins appears much more comfortable as a receiver than he does as a pass protector. However, he has the quickness and strength to hold up against pass-rushers, and he naturally flows into position to pick up rushers off the edge.

    Power

    16/20

    Collins does not demonstrate the power one would like to see from a fullback of his size. He does not often drive defenders back or knock them out of position with his punch as a blocker. As a runner, Collins can take on contact but does not often power through defenders.

    Speed

    6/10

    Collins lacks burst as a runner out of the backfield, but he shows good quickness as a receiver and run-blocker. He is not going to outrun anyone with the ball in his hands, but he can get open on short routes and pick up blocks both downfield and outside.

    Hands

    14/20

    Though he had two drops on just 19 targets this season, Collins is usually reliable as a pass-catcher. He has good hands and can catch the ball away from his body. He is good at running out routes and making plays going toward the sidelines.

    Overall

    72/100

    Collins’ game does not stand out in any area, but he is a well-rounded player and a solid starter on the New Orleans offense. He is an adequate lead blocker for the rushing offense, and he adds value as a receiver out of the backfield.

9. Vonta Leach, Baltimore Ravens

9 of 17

    Chris Humphreys-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Run Block

    21/25

    Considered for years to be the NFL’s best lead-blocking fullback, Vonta Leach (6’0”, 260 lbs, 10 seasons) was still opening up running lanes in 2013. He syncs his eyes and feet well to find defenders and pick them up and works through traffic well to make blocks. 

    Pass Block

    14/25

    Leach has done a solid job in the past with picking up defenders in the backfield and shielding the pocket, but he has lost a step athletically and was used sparingly in this capacity in 2013.

    Power

    19/20

    Leach throws his weight into his blocks for hard-hitting collisions. He packs a strong punch and does everything behind his pads, though he does not run as powerfully as he blocks.

    Speed

    6/10

    Leach does not outrun many players. But even though he is slowing down, he shows solid foot skills and turns upfield well. He can get out of the backfield quickly, but he lacks burst as a runner and struggles to separate from linebackers as a receiver.

    Hands

    14/20

    A solid hands catcher, Leach caught 11 passes for 47 yards on 17 targets in 2013. He does not have playmaking ability as a receiver, but he is reliable.

    Overall

    74/100

    Although his career is in decline, Leach still showed flashes of his old self in 2013. He does not do much with the ball in his hands but remains a solid lead blocker.

8. John Kuhn, Green Bay Packers

10 of 17

    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    18/25

    John Kuhn (6’0”, 250 lbs, eight seasons) is not an impactful lead blocker. He does a good job staying in front of the play and can get downfield quickly, but he struggles to redirect defenders.

    Pass Block

    24/25

    A capable pass protector in the pocket, Kuhn does a good job kicking out to the edge and getting his hands on defenders. He is good at picking up blitzers and chipping them backward, and he can also hold his position when shielding pass-rushers off the edge.

    Power

    12/20

    Kuhn is not powerful for a back of his size. He does not have an impactful punch, and he does not frequently drive defenders away from the ball. He was largely ineffective as a between-the-tackles runner in 2013, gaining just 40 yards on 12 rushing attempts.

    Speed

    7/10

    Even at 250 pounds, Kuhn looks more like a running back athletically than a traditional fullback. He does not have an explosive burst out of the backfield, but he has good feet and some bounce when the ball is in his hands. 

    Hands

    15/20

    Kuhn is a clean catcher of the football who consistently makes grabs with his hands. He caught 15 passes for 97 yards in 2013.

    Overall

    76/100

    Kuhn’s reputed running ability has always been higher than the production, but he has a good combination of size and athleticism. He is at his best as a pass-blocker and receiver but is capable as a runner and run-blocker.

7. Jerome Felton, Minnesota Vikings

11 of 17

    Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Run Block

    20/25

    Jerome Felton (6’0”, 248 lbs, six seasons) is a true downhill run-blocker who shows no hesitancy in coming out of the backfield and throwing his body into defenders to pick up lead blocks. He often pops linebackers backward when he hits them, but he could improve in sustaining blocks.

    Pass Block

    15/25

    Used sparingly as a pass protector, Felton struggles against taller pass-rushers and with sustaining pass blocks.

    Power

    17/20

    Felton is not a drive blocker who will move defenders away from the ball at will, but he packs a strong punch. He is unproven as a power runner. He did not have a single rushing attempt in 2013.

    Speed

    8/10

    Felton does not stand out athletically. He moves his feet with relative quickness but does not show much downfield speed as a blocker or receiver.

    Hands

    16/20

    Felton caught only six passes in 2013. He likely was not targeted more because of his limited athleticism, but he can catch the ball in his hands cleanly and with strength. 

    Overall

    76/100

    Felton was suspended for the first three games of the 2013 season for a violation of the NFL’s substance-abuse policy but retained a key role in Minnesota’s offense as a lead-blocking fullback upon his return.

6. Bruce Miller, San Francisco 49ers

12 of 17

    Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    23/25

    The San Francisco 49ers typically run behind Bruce Miller (6’2”, 248 lbs, three seasons) when he is on the field, and he is reliable at leading the way. He does a great job singling out targets and does not hesitate to shoot his arms out from his body and meet defenders in running lanes with force. He excels playing in front of Colin Kaepernick in San Francisco’s read-option offense.

    Pass Block

    16/25

    Used sparingly in this capacity, Miller does not bring a lot to the table as a pass-blocker. He can utilize his athleticism to pick up blocks in the pocket and out in space, but, despite his size, he is often driven back by bigger, more powerful pass-rushers.

    Power

    18/20

    Miller has the strength to move defenders out of running lanes as a run-blocker, but he is not known for being a bulldozer who drives his opponents backward. He is not much of a runner between the tackles, having gained just 13 yards on seven carries in 2013.

    Speed

    6/10

    Miller moves decently well in the open field, but he does not have much burst out of the backfield. He does not show the speed to separate from linebackers as a downfield receiver.

    Hands

    15/20

    Miller caught 25 passes for 243 yards in 2013 and has shown that he can make grabs in front of his body. That said, he dropped three passes this season.

    Overall

    78/100

    A converted defensive end, Miller has taken well to the fullback position in his first three NFL seasons. He is solid as both a run-blocker and a receiver, and he is a special teams staple for the 49ers. His 2013 season ended early when he was placed on injured reserve after Week 15 with a fractured scapula.

5. Anthony Sherman, Kansas City Chiefs

13 of 17

    John Rieger-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Run Block

    23/25

    Anthony Sherman (5’10”, 242 lbs, three seasons) positions himself well as a run-blocker and efficiently seals off defenders both inside and outside. He syncs his upper body well with his feet and consistently finds blitzing lanes and fills them to keep defenders out of the backfield.

    Pass Block

    22/25

    Sherman is not used as a pass-blocker often, but he is effective when asked to pick up blitzers as a chip blocker out of the backfield. He struggles when he plays as a tight end or closer to the line of scrimmage and has to block edge rushers.

    Power

    12/20

    Sherman is a tough, physical player, but he does not exhibit much ability to drive defenders back as a blocker or power through contact as a runner. 

    Speed

    7/10

    Though he moves his feet efficiently as a blocker, Sherman is not particularly fleet of foot. He can get to the second level to pick up blocks, but he is not a big-play threat with the ball in his hands.

    Hands

    15/20

    Sherman is a reliable hands catcher out of the backfield. He caught 20 passes for 156 yards and two touchdowns in 2013. 

    Overall

    79/100

    Though there is not much flash about Sherman’s game, he is one of the league’s best traditional I-formation fullbacks. He is a technically sound blocker, a reliable receiver and a terrific special teams player.

4. Rhett Ellison, Minnesota Vikings

14 of 17

    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    21/25

    Rhett Ellison (6’5”, 250 lbs, two seasons) is a hybrid fullback/tight end who blocks as much from the line of scrimmage as he does out of the backfield. His strength is using his athleticism to get to the second level, where he does a good job picking up downfield blocks.

    Pass Block

    20/25

    Though he often runs routes as a pass-catching H-back, he has demonstrated a more-than-adequate pass-blocking ability. He uses his feet well to slide out to edge blocks or kick in to help interior linemen, and he displays the strength and length to fend off pass-rushers outside. 

    Power

    16/20

    Ellison has a solid punch but is often overpowered when engaged in battle with a defender. He does not drive many defenders away from the ball and can be pushed back himself. He is not going to run through many open-field tackles and has no career rushing attempts.

    Speed

    7/10

    Ellison is a solid athlete who can come out of the backfield and off the line of scrimmage quickly. He does not have field-stretching speed, but he gets to the second level fluidly and moves his feet well as both a receiver and a blocker.

    Hands

    16/20

    Ellison is typically a good hands catcher, though in 2013, he caught only five passes and had one drop go off his hands into the hands of a defender for an interception. Despite that, his experience playing tight end makes him a reliable downfield receiver.

    Overall

    80/100

    Ellison missed five games with injury in 2013, but his versatility to line up in a variety of spots on the Vikings offensive line made him a valuable chip on the field. He is a solid receiver and blocker who adds value as a regular on special teams.

3. Marcel Reece, Oakland Raiders

15 of 17

    Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    21/25

    Marcel Reece (6’1”, 255 lbs, four seasons) has nearly as much speed and quickness as the running backs for whom he blocks, which gives him an advantage in getting upfield and picking up blocks without getting in their way. He does not always stick and sustain his blocks, but he can make blocks all over the field and spring rushers both inside and outside.

    Pass Block

    18/25

    Used much more often as a receiver than as a pass-blocker, Reece is a smart, patient protector who positions himself well against blitzing rushers. He lets pass-rushers come to him and has the size and strength to pick them up and keep them away from the quarterback.

    Power

    17/20

    Reece is not going to run over many defenders, but he is a physical runner who is tough to bring down. It is imperative for defenders to wrap up Reece to tackle him. He consistently runs through arm tackles and has a solid stiff arm. As a run-blocker, however, he does not exhibit the power to drive back many defenders.

    Speed

    10/10

    A very good open-field athlete for a fullback, Reece can turn runs and receptions out of the backfield into big plays. He also has the speed to run deep routes. He has some issues separating downfield as a receiver, but he is a far more dynamic threat with the ball in his hands than most fullbacks.

    Hands

    16/20

    Reece led all NFL fullbacks with 32 receptions for 331 yards in 2013. He is a reliable pass-catcher out of the backfield who can also make plays on the ball downfield. However, he did drop four passes this season.

    Overall

    82/100

    There are many better lead-blocking fullbacks in the NFL than Reece, but no other fullback has Reece’s offensive playmaking ability. He can line up as a halfback, tight end, H-back and even as a wide receiver, and he can make a difference as a runner or as a receiver.

2. John Conner, New York Giants

16 of 17

    Andrew Weber-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Run Block

    24/25

    John Conner (5’11”, 245 lbs, four seasons) fits the traditional fullback mold as a bruising lead blocker. He throws his weight into blocksnot always successfullybut can be counted on to create lanes for his team’s running backs.

    Pass Block

    21/25

    Conner was not used frequently as a pass-blocker in 2013, but he was effective when used in that capacity. He syncs his eyes and feet well to find blitzing pass-rushers and then gets in position to pick them up.

    Power

    20/20

    As a blocker, Conner regularly bulldozes opponents head-on and drives them back or buries them into the ground. He is unproven as a power runner because he did not have a single rushing attempt in 2013.

    Speed

    6/10

    Conner has decent feet for a fullback, but he is never going to be much of a playmaker with the ball in his hands. Though he can be dominant as an in-line lead blocker, he does not make many blocks out in space.

    Hands

    15/20

    Conner set a career high in pass receptions in 2013 but still caught only six balls. He was not credited with any dropped passes but tends to let his catches into his body.

    Overall

    86/100

    Conner is the type of lead blocker every running back should want to have sealing off blockers and opening running lanes. However, the Giants' top fullback doesn’t offer much outside of run-blocking.

1. Mike Tolbert, Carolina Panthers

17 of 17

    Chris Trotman/Getty Images

     

    Run Block

    18/25

    Mike Tolbert (5’9”, 245 lbs, six seasons) utilizes a combination of power and quickness that makes him an effective run-blocker. He might be a better runner out of the backfield than an in-line blocker, but he is good at picking up second-level blocks downfield and lead blocks on the outside.

    Pass Block

    24/25

    Tolbert is a solid pass-protecting fullback who can be brought up to the line of scrimmage or used out of the backfield to pick up an edge-rusher and shield the pocket. His biggest issues in that capacity can come with the length and power advantages of opposing defenders.

    Power

    20/20

    Tolbert isn’t a traditional power back, but he ran with enough strength and toughness between the tackles to lead all NFL fullbacks with 361 regular-season yards and five touchdowns on 101 carries. He exhibits strength as a run-blocker, even against bigger defenders.

    Speed

    7/10

    A much more well-rounded athlete than one might expect a 245-pound fullback to be, Tolbert is fast enough to be split out as a wide receiver. Whether he is serving as a runner, a blocker out in space or a receiving threat, Tolbert demonstrates quick feet and the ability to extend plays.

    Hands

    18/20

    He didn’t have to make any deep downfield catches, but Tolbert caught all but one pass thrown his way this season. He is rarely a first option on pass plays but is a reliable checkdown receiver.

    Overall

    87/100

    While most teams seldom use their fullbacks and largely use them as lead blockers, Tolbert led all NFL fullbacks in snaps in 2013 while playing a variety of roles. He is a jack of all trades whose combination of rushing productivity, receiving reliability and solid blocking makes him versatile and valuable.

Where can I comment?

Stay on your game

Latest news, insights, and forecasts on your teams across leagues.

Choose Teams
Get it on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Real-time news for your teams right on your mobile device.

Download
Copyright © 2017 Bleacher Report, Inc. Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. All Rights Reserved. BleacherReport.com is part of Bleacher Report – Turner Sports Network, part of the Turner Sports and Entertainment Network. Certain photos copyright © 2017 Getty Images. Any commercial use or distribution without the express written consent of Getty Images is strictly prohibited. AdChoices