Deron Williams and Chris Paul: The Future Has Arrived

Michael WhittenbergSenior Writer IDecember 1, 2007

IconDeron Williams and Chris Paul are the best young point guards in the NBA today.

The two third-year 1's— selected third and fourth overall in 2005—are taking the league by storm.

I knew then he was going to be special—but not so special so soon.

If you're looking to rebuild a franchise, Williams is the man you want to run the show.

Playing for Jerry Sloan is a huge plus for Williams, as the no-nonsense coach is sure to help the youngster hone his mental toughness.

Williams' size and strength compare favorably to that of Jason Kidd. Williams is quicker off the dribble than I expected him to be, and his upper body strength gives him an advantage when he penetrates to the basket.

He also knows how to take contact at the rim, and is more than capable of hitting from the perimeter. 

William's playoff performance last season offered only a glimpse of his potential. He's averaging 18 points and nine assists thus far in '07-'08, and his Utah Jazz are one of the power teams in the Western Conference.

Bottom line: The future looks bright in Salt Lake City. 

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IconAs for Paul—I had the pleasure of watching him live while he played at Wake Forest.

As a Duke fan, I never had much love for the young Deacon—but you can't argue with what he's done in the pros.

Paul's true value was evident both in Wake's collapse after his departure and the Hornets' emergence as contenders after his arrival.

As a player, Paul is unselfish and lighting-quick, and like Williams has great upper body strength.

His shooting could use some work, but his ability to penetrate is better than most observers give him credit for.

Paul is averaging 18 points and 10 assists this season.

Five or six years down the road, Kidd and Steve Nash will have faded into retirement—and point guards like Williams and Paul (and Tony Parker too) will rule the league.

Who's the better between the two youngsters?

You can't go wrong with either—but if I had to pick one I'd take Williams because of his size and physical presence.

Big point guards, of course, create matchup problems for opponents. That said, there is no bad choice—as teams around the NBA are sure to find out in the next decade.

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